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terrier [2009/08/23 03:13]
historian
terrier [2009/08/23 03:17]
historian
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 All blocks of the Standard SM-1ER missile were designated as RIM-67A. They were essentially identical to the corresponding SM-1MR missile, except for the propulsion. Instead of the MR's MK-56 dual-thrust motor, the ER used an Atlantic Research Corp. MK 30 solid-fuel rocket sustainer motor, and a Hercules MK 12 booster. All blocks of the Standard SM-1ER missile were designated as RIM-67A. They were essentially identical to the corresponding SM-1MR missile, except for the propulsion. Instead of the MR's MK-56 dual-thrust motor, the ER used an Atlantic Research Corp. MK 30 solid-fuel rocket sustainer motor, and a Hercules MK 12 booster.
  
-The main improvements of the SM-2MR Block I/II/III missiles were also included in the corresponding SM-2ER versions, the major new features being the inertial guidance system, and the monopulse seeker for terminal homing. However, SM-2ER is not designed to be fired from Aegis ships. The SM-2ER Block I was designated RIM-67B, and entered service in 1980.+The main improvements of the SM-2MR Block I/II/III missiles were also included in the corresponding SM-2ER versions, the major new features being the inertial guidance system, and the monopulse seeker for terminal homing. However, SM-2ER is not designed to be fired from Aegis ships. The SM-2ER Block I was designated RIM-67B, and entered service in 1980. All of the former DLG's were upgraded to support the SM-2(ER) missile with the exception of the USS COONTZ and the USS KING.
  
 The RIM-67C SM-2ER Block II introduced a new MK 70 booster (re-grained MK 12), which almost doubled the range of the SM-2ER. Interestingly,​ the enhanced booster extended the performance envelope of the RIM-67C well beyond the limits of the then current fire-control system on Terrier ships, but it did of course improve general missile performance against high-performance targets. The RIM-67C SM-2ER Block II introduced a new MK 70 booster (re-grained MK 12), which almost doubled the range of the SM-2ER. Interestingly,​ the enhanced booster extended the performance envelope of the RIM-67C well beyond the limits of the then current fire-control system on Terrier ships, but it did of course improve general missile performance against high-performance targets.
  
-In the 1980's the U.S. Navy planned a nuclear-armed version of the Standard SM-2ER, because the last nuclear armed surface-to-air missiles, the RIM-2D Terrier and RIM-8E/G/J Talos, were about to be retired, leaving the Navy without a nuclear anti-air warfare capability. The nuclear SM-2 was to be equipped with a W-81 fission warhead (4 kT yield). However, these plans have since been dropped, and the U.S. Navy has currently no nuclear-armed SAMs.###+In the 1980's the U.S. Navy planned a nuclear-armed version of the Standard SM-2ER, because the last nuclear armed surface-to-air missiles, the RIM-2D Terrier and RIM-8E/G/J Talos, were about to be retired, leaving the Navy without a nuclear anti-air warfare capability. The nuclear SM-2 was to be equipped with a W-81 fission warhead (4 kT yield). However, these plans have since been dropped, and the U.S. Navy has currently no nuclear-armed SAMs
 + 
 +In 1986, the USS KING and the USS COONTZ were the only remaining Terrier platforms capable of deploying the HTR-3 missile as well as the BT-3A and the SM-1ER. The HTR-3 support electronics were disabled in 1987 and the USS King became one of the last ships to disable the BT-3A support electronics in 1989.###
  
  
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 |Propulsion (booster)| Hercules MK 12 solid-rocket|Hercules MK 70 solid-rocket| |Propulsion (booster)| Hercules MK 12 solid-rocket|Hercules MK 70 solid-rocket|
 |Warhead|MK 51 continuous-rod|MK 115 blast-fragmentation| |Warhead|MK 51 continuous-rod|MK 115 blast-fragmentation|
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-###In 1986, the USS KING and the USS COONTZ were the only remaining Terrier platforms capable of deploying the HTR-3 missile as well as the BT-3A and the SM-1ER. The HTR-3 support electronics were disabled in 1987 and the USS King became one of the last ships to disable the BT-3A support electronics in 1989.### 
  
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